Bookmark and Share

Find Brentwood California Hotels, Real Estate, Job Listings, and much more local information on this city guide.

Welcome to Brentwood, CA

Brentwood, California

About Brentwood:

Brentwood is a city located in Contra Costa County, California. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 23,302.

Brentwood Cornfest is a food festival that features the white sweet corn grown in the area. (More Info and Source) Brentwood Real Estate

Brentwood Area Hotels

HAMPTON INN BRENTWOOD HAMPTON INN BRENTWOOD
Hotel rate starting at just $106 at priceline.com logo

We've located quality area hotels in any budget.

click to search for Brentwood hotels
COURTYARD LOS ANGELES SHERMAN OAKS COURTYARD LOS ANGELES SHERMAN OAKS
Hotel rate starting at just $149 at priceline.com logo
STAR INN HOTEL - UNIVERSAL STUDIOS STAR INN HOTEL - UNIVERSAL STUDIOS
Hotel rate starting at just $89 at priceline.com logo

Top 3 Jobs in Brentwood

Brentwood Area News

Teen out of coma after horrific long-boarding accident

An East Bay teenager has made a remarkable recovery just one month after a devastating skateboarding accident.

Just two and a half weeks ago Ryan Carroll was in a coma after the Santa Barbara City College student suffered a serious head-injury after crashing on a long-board.

Now that Carroll is out of a coma and returning to his old self, he's become a huge advocate for helmet use.

"I was like one step above clinical death," he said.

Carroll returned home last Saturday after a rough month in the ICU rehabbing from his injuries.

"I went to sleep on the 19th, and woke up on April 10th or something like that in the hospital. It was crazy," he said.

On March 20th Carroll was riding a long-board, which is essentially a big skateboard more stable at high speeds, when he crashed.

"I feel like I should have been wearing a helmet and I feel like I should have been a little more cautious," he said.

After coming out of the coma, he struggled to regain his speech and movement. The injury has also changed his sense of taste.

"With any remote sweet taste in it, it just tastes like Oreos now. And it's really annoying because you can have only so many Oreos," Carroll said.

The teen’s mother was an advocate for helmet use before the accident. Now she demands it of all of her children.

"I will say as I was wandering around Santa Barbara while I was down there, everywhere I looked, there were kids skating around without helmets on. And it was really hard for me to not stop people and give them a story," explained Terri Carroll.

Just three days before Ryan Carroll crashed, a 20-year-old woman from Martinez was not so lucky.  Kate Hopkins was also in a long-boarding accident.  She died from her injuries.

"It was scary to realize that I was that close to death and that someone who had the same exact experience as me had died. So, it was quite a reality check," Carroll said.

Carroll is still having trouble with his short term memory.  His medical bills, mostly covered by Kaiser, already total in the millions.

 

Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:54:12 -0700

Officials: Oakland in uphill battle to keep sports teams

Mayor Jean Quan and City Councilman Larry Reid were among the officials who admitted Wednesday that Oakland's "back is against the wall" in trying to keep the Golden State Warriors, the Athletics and the Raiders in the East Bay city.

Reid, who is vice chair of the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum Authority, which oversees the O.co. Coliseum and the Oracle Arena, said, "If not all three teams, we would like to keep at least two here."

Reid's candid remarks came as he and Alameda County Supervisor Nate Miley, who chairs the Coliseum Authority, addressed developments this week that are affecting the futures of the Golden State Warriors basketball team, the Oakland's A's baseball team and the Oakland Raiders football team.

Reid said Oakland's issues with all three teams aren't new, saying, "Things have been unraveling for a long time. This didn't start today."

On Tuesday morning, the Warriors announced they plan to build a new arena in the Mission Bay neighborhood in San Francisco, a shift from their earlier plans to build an arena along San Francisco's waterfront.

The team said it would like to move to the arena before the 2018-19 NBA season.

On Tuesday night, the A's said they have rejected a proposal by the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum Authority to extend their lease at the O.co Coliseum for 10 years.

And on Monday the Raiders missed a deadline for submitting a letter of interest to work on a project to change the 132-acre Coliseum complex into a sports and entertainment hub with new stadiums.

Miley and Reid both conceded that the Coliseum Authority faces a tough road in trying to keep the Warriors in Oakland but they hope the authority can keep the A's and Raiders in the city.

Miley said, "We're not going to fight the Warriors' decision to relocate to San Francisco but we want them to stay and we're keeping the welcome mat out."

Oakland Mayor Jean Quan said East Bay Warrior fans are "disappointed" about the team's plans but added, "As mayor, I have to keep the welcome mat out" and there's still a chance that the Warriors' plans to move won't work out.

Last November, the Coliseum Authority agreed to extend the A's lease at the O.co Coliseum for two years, through the end of 2015, and the lease for the Raiders for one year, through the end of the 2014-15 football season.

Miley said talks about extending the A's lease for a longer period have been going on since then and he's glad the team is interested in extending the lease for another 10 years, through 2024, but "the issue is the details of the terms."

He said among the issues is the belief by city of Oakland and Alameda County officials that the A's owe them more than $5 million because they haven't been paying their rent for more than five years.

That money could be used for public purposes such as hiring more police officers or funding health services, Miley said.

He said another key issue is whether the A's agree to build a new baseball-only stadium at the Coliseum complex and if they would agree to pay for most of the complex.

The city and county would prefer only to pay for some of the infrastructure costs for a new stadium, Miley said.

However, it would possible to extend the A's lease for 10 years without any agreement on building a new stadium, he said.

"Those are separate issues that don't have to be linked," Miley said.

Miley said another complication is the possibility that the Raiders build a new football-only stadium at the Coliseum complex site but the A's wind up without a new baseball-only stadium.

Under that scenario, the Coliseum Authority would let the A's get out of their lease before it expires, he said.

A's President Michael Crowley reacted angrily to Miley's comments Wednesday, saying, "We owe no back rent or any other amounts."

He said, "We did deduct rent payments in the past for items that we are allowed under our lease but that was our negotiated lease."

Crowley said, "There is absolutely nothing in either our lease offer to them or their counterproposal that mentions any kind of subsidy" for building a new stadium.

He said, "We have nothing additional to offer and as a result there will be no further negotiations."

Wed, 23 Apr 2014 17:28:10 -0700

Former Iron Curtain still barrier for deer

The Iron Curtain was traced by an electrified barbed-wire fence that isolated the communist world from the West.

It was an impenetrable Cold War barrier — and for some inhabitants of the Czech Republic it still is.

Deer still balk at crossing the border with Germany even though the physical fence came down a quarter century ago, new studies show.

Czechoslovakia, where the communists took power in 1948, had three parallel electrified fences, patrolled by heavily armed guards. Nearly 500 people were killed when they attempted to escape communism.

Deer were also victims of the barrier. A seven-year study in the Czech Republic's Sumava National Park showed that the original Iron Curtain line still deters one species, red deer, from crossing.

"It was fascinating to realize for the first time that anything like that is possible," said Pavel Sustr, a biologist who led the Czech project. Scientists conducting research on German territory reached similar conclusions.

The average life expectancy for deer is 15 years and none living now would have encountered the barrier.

"But the border still plays a role for them and separates the two populations," Sustr said. He said the research showed the animals stick to traditional life patterns, returning every year to the same places.

"Fawns follow mothers for the first year of their life and learn from them where to go," Sustr said.

Wildlife officials recorded the movement of some 300 Czech and German deer with GPS-equipped collars which sent data to computers.

"I don't think it's a surprising result," said professor Ludek Bartos of the Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague, who was not involved in the research. "These animals are really conservative."

Wed, 23 Apr 2014 16:32:18 -0700

News Source: MedleyStory More Local News Stories

Brentwood Apartments

There are 241 apartments found in and near the Brentwood area.
View Apartment Listings


Featured Apartment:
The Evergreens The Evergreens
Visit Italy, Greece and Cruise to Turkey Retracing the Steps of Paul!